Thursday, September 10, 2015

Sent home from school because of the wrong uniform sadface collection part two

Another week and more kids back to school... and then sent straight home again because headteachers have funny ideas about uniforms. Here's another collection of school sadfaces to go with the last lot:

Bournemouth Echo: Who do you think you are? Johnny Rotten? Home you go

Stoke Sentinel: Trousers too tight? We're not buying your 'fat legs' plea, home you go

Coventry Telegraph: Hair the wrong colour? Here, let us help you dye it ginger


Hull Daily Mail: Wrong trousers? Boys might be able to see your bum. Home you go

And we're running this one from June again because it's so funny:

Wolverhampton Express and Star: Not wearing your blazer on the hottest day of the year? Into isolation with you, young man

And with one photograph, one young life ruined.

2 comments:

Smashherbackdoorsin said...

Cor, that second ones mum is a right milf.

John Carver said...

In the weeks leading up to the long hot summer of 1976, I was a pupil at Wombwell High School near Barnsley in South Yorkshire.

As the temperature began rising day by day, eventually one or two of the more daring pupils began to unbutton their blazers, some even went as far as to remove their pullovers. Those who were caught were threatened with detention as this was a blatant breach of school rules

Tensions began to grow and more and more pupils began to arrive at school wearing less than full school uniform.

As the temperature reached 24 degrees Celcius, a notice to all pupils was posted stating that the uniform, for boys in this example, consisted of trousers, shirt-which must be fully buttoned at all times, school tie-which had to be correctly tied and pulled up, a school jumper and blazer which had to be fully buttoned up and must not be removed under any other circumstances than when in PE lessons.

Anyone found guilty of any infringment of this rule would face detention or possible expulsion from school. (there were no such things as exclusion or isolation in those days.)

Regretably some pupils collapsed due to heat exhaustion but the powers that be still would not bow to pressure.

Eventually this led to the uniform riots where a number of the more radical pupils refused to attend school and ran amok, basically staged for the benefit of a BBC Look North camera crew who were dispatched to cover the story.

These days, health and safety regulations fortunately would prevail and ultimately if anyone came to any harm as the result of a stupid school rule being enforced, someone would rightly face criminal charges.

Schools should be about education and should accept that people learn more in a relaxed and comfortable environment not one in which draconian rules are enforced.